narputo:

geeksquadgangbang:

Sarah Silverman is visited by Jesus Christ

This is one of the best responses to men against abortion ever

(via alifeoftodolists)

There are two kinds of light—the glow that illuminates, and the glare that obscures.

James Thurber  (via saysoju)

(via alifeoftodolists)

thispleasesmorbo:

slovver:

Game of Tweets

this is one of the best things I’ve ever seen

(via alifeoftodolists)

cumpletelyhappy:

wineafterwhiskey:

this is everything. 

This is hilarious.

(via alifeoftodolists)

For a star to be born, there is one thing that must happen: a gaseous nebula must collapse.

So collapse.
Crumble.
This is not your destruction.

This is your birth.

(via villettess)

afallowfield:

But is it really you
behind the pretenses
beyond dust and distances
beneath the salt and the siren
announcements and ancient
impurities and decays
that claim to be you

W. S. Merwin, from “To the Smell of Water” in Present Company (Copper Canyon Press, 2007)

(via villettess)

Monday would like you to leave it alone. It is not its fault that you are emotionally unprepared for your professional lives.

Community Calendar, Welcome to Night Vale Live, West Coast Tour 2014 (via aoife-okeefe)

(via alifeoftodolists)

“It’s a strange grief […] to die of nostalgia for something you never lived.”

Alessandro Baricco, from Silk, trans. Guido Waldman (Harvill Press, 1997)

(via villettess)

Slowly I began to understand fully that there was no place in academe for folks from working-class backgrounds who did not wish to leave the past behind. That was the price of the ticket. Poor students would be welcome at the best institutions of higher learning only if they were willing to surrender memory, to forget the past and claim the assimilated present as the only worthwhile and meaningful reality.

Students from nonprivileged backgrounds who did not want to forget often had nervous breakdowns. They could not bear the weight of all the contradictions they had to confront. They were crushed. More often than not they dropped out with no trace of their inner anguish recorded, no institutional record of the myriad ways their take on the world was assaulted by an elite vision of class and privilege. The records merely indicated that even after receiving financial aid and other support, these students simply could not make it, simply were not good enough.

At no time in my years as a student did I march in a graduation ceremony. I was not proud to hold degrees from institutions where I had been constantly scorned and shamed. I wanted to forget these experiences, to erase them from my consciousness. Like a prisoner set free, I did not want to remember my years on the inside.

bell hooks, Where We Stand: Class Matters: “Coming to Class Consciousness” (via ondulacion)

(via alifeoftodolists)